Student's Friend Support

These tools directly support teaching with the Student's Friend concise alternative textbook. Usage notes are included at the bottom of this page.

View or download the Student's Friend

Study guides for each Student's Friend unit, both Parts 1 and 2

The Student's Friend: Why and How?

Timeline: Four Eras of History

     This periodization scheme is used by the Student's Friend

     concise alternative textbook.


World History & Geography, Part 1

Prehistory to 1500


Quizzes are available for the following pages (MS Word files):

11, 12, 17, 18, 21, 22, 23, 24


Study Questions are available for the following pages (MS Word files):

1 & 2, 13 & 14


Illustrated timeline project for Part 1

An individual or group project designed to cement knowledge

of historical chronology

          Instructions: pdf file or MS Word file (can be modified

          Grading rubric: pdf file



World History & Geography, Part 2

1500 to Present


Joel Allen's Curriculum

Joel is an Iowa teacher who has developed an extensive curriculum to accompany Part 2 of the Student's Friend.  It includes PowerPoint lesson plans, DBQs, primary sources, videos and more.


Quizzes are available for the following pages (MS Word files):

27, 28, 31, 32, 33, 34, 39, 40, 43


Study Questions are available for the following pages (MS Word files):

37 & 38, 44, 47 & 48


Illustrated time project for Part 2

An individual or group project designed to cement knowledge

of historical chronology

          Instructions: pdf file or MS Word file (can be modified

          Grading rubric: pdf file

__________


Usage notes

In my classes, I wanted students to write about each topic in the Student's Friend, and these writings generally alternated between three activities: Key Points, Notes/Quiz, and Study Questions, with a few other miscellaneous strategies thrown in for flavor.  This is why you will not see quizzes or study questions listed above for every page of the Student's Friend.

I emphasized Key Points at the beginning of my courses to get students in the habit of thinking in terms of two main components whenever they were asked to explain or describe a historical concept or event.  Students were asked to examine Student's Friend topics for answers to the questions: "What is it? (definition) and "Why is it important? (significance).


The Notes/Quiz activity asked students to take notes on Student's Friend topics, and students would then use these notes to answer the Quiz questions that followed.  (Some teachers like to administrer quizzes—without student access to notes—for every topic to take advantage of the "testing effect," which has been shown to be helpful in helping students retain information.)

The Study Questions activity most closely resembled the standard textbook approach that asks students to answer questions based on their reading.  Perhaps because I dislike history textbooks so much, I relied on this approach the least. I preferred to engage students with open-ended questions such as those that can be found in the Unit Study Guides available above.


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